Honda CRF1000 Africa Twin Traction Control Memory module installation

Right! While the tank was off,  I installed the Traction Control (TC) memory module switch/sticky switch. You might ask what the hell I’m on about…well here’s a video:

Basically this little gem remembers the TC setting you want. Leave the selector switch on one, and it stays on one, what ever floats your boat/sinks your sub. You still have full use of your OEM TC selector switch.
I got the switch from my buddy Richard at 12’O Clock performance.
Cost $150 USD
Contact him here to get your grubby hands on one: 12operformance@gmail.com

Let’s do it!  You will need:

  1. TC module from Richard
  2. Tie wraps
  3. Wire cutters
  4. Linesman pliers (for t-splice connectors)
  5. Heat gun (optional)
  6. Solder gun (optional)
  7. Solder (optional)
  8. Heat shrink, large and small (optional)

The kit comes with all you need.   Good set of clear and straight forward instructions.
IMG_3359 Remove the tank. Follow your owners manual. The kit suggest to run the wires on the left hand side of the bike. I found lots of real estate on the right hand side, along my gps, radar, heated grip wiring. I installed the switch 1st, and worked my way back to the ECU.  Ladies choice! Either side will work.  IMG_3362
IMG_3363

The calm before the storm! Not really, but I usually take pictures before I dive in.  That way I remember which way the hoses go etc..
IMG_3355

A few things I did to make the work easier:

  1. Removed the fuel line
  2. Unplugged both connectors near the ECU
  3. Undid the one bolt that holds the ECU down
  4. Cut back the insulation all the way to the large bundle.  This will make things stupid easy later, as per below picture.

IMG_3364

  • Instructions are straight forward and easy to follow.  There’s also a handy diagram of the ECU connector to locate the two wires.
  • I used the inline quick connectors to test the wiring 1st, and grounded the black wire to the right hand side ECU tray bolt (blue arrow below).  Note:  You could stop here.  The inline crimps work well, and the addition doesn’t necessarily need to be soldered, hence all the optional tools at the beginning of the post.

ECU bolt

  • Once I was happy with the operation of the switch, I got the solder gun out, and went to town
  • Cover the wires that you are not working on with a cloth, or what have you.  Use the heat of the solder gun to peel back about 1/4-3/8″ of insulation.  Strip back the yellow and red wires the same length.  Tin both wires 1st, then solder them together.  Make sure there’s no sharp pointy things sticking out after the soldering job.

IMG_3366
Get your 1″ long piece of 3/8″ heat shrink, cut it down the middle and slip over the wire.
IMG_3371 Grab some tie wraps, and tie wrap the heat shrink on the wires. Grab your heat gun and slowly and evenly heat the heat shrink. As it heats up, because it’s cut it will have a tendency to want to fold out. Use your fingers to glue it back together, and tighten up the ties as your’re going. Repeat the above for the second wire.  Once you’re satisfied, cut off the ties.  I also ran a longer 1.5″ heat shrink over the 1″ shrink.  Double up the protection.   Not really necessary, but whatever…I had it cut and ready to go.IMG_3375

Once that’s done, I took a large 1″ diameter shrink, split it down the middle, and cut it roughly at 1″ long.  I put that around the entire bundle of wire that  serves the black ECU plug in.  Tie wrapped it semi tight, heated it up, and removed the ties once it was set.
IMG_3376 Dress all your wires, secure the module where ever you please, and put the tank back on. IMG_3377
Plug all your connectors back in. Test the TC switch one more time before installing the tank.
Enjoy your new sticky TC switch!

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4 thoughts on “Honda CRF1000 Africa Twin Traction Control Memory module installation

  1. I may buy it, seems like a great idea.
    The thing that troubles me is the it might void the Honda Protection Plan/ warranty.

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